Country/ballad

Exploring Pathways of Appreciation

To foster an awareness and appreciation of music by listening and coming to appreciate how the diverse application of shared elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, texture and form gives rise to such diverse expressive pathways showcasing an inner beauty of the human spirit.

Here are links to music performances showing diverse styles and performance as voiced around the world; each expressing a component part of a global diverse counterpoint of cultural contrast. Enjoy yourself and do check on the links.

Without support from authoritive references this site would not be possible.

In Counterpoint of Cultural Contrast

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country and western music

Country and western music, American popular music form originating in the Southeast (country music) and the Southwest and West (western music). The two regional styles coalesced in the 1920s when recorded material became available in rural areas, and they were further consolidated after musicians from various sections met and mixed during service in World War II. The primary traditional difference between the two styles is that country music is simpler and uses fewer instruments, relying on guitar, fiddle, banjo, and harmonica, whereas the music of the Southwest tends toward steel guitars and big bands whose style verges on swing (e.g., The Light Crust Doughboys). Bluegrass, exemplified by Bill Monroe, is a style of country and western music distinguished by a driving, syncopated rhythm, high-pitched vocals, and an emphasis on the banjo, mandolin, and fiddle.

Country and western music is directly descended from the folk songs, ballads, and popular songs of the English, Scottish, and Irish settlers of the U.S. southeastern seaboard. Its modern lyrics depict the emotions and experience of rural and (currently) urban poor whites; they often tell frankly of illicit love, crime, and prison life. Over the last 50 years country and western music has gained a nationwide audience. Since 1925 the Grand Ole Opry, a Saturday night performance featuring country and western singers, has been broadcast weekly from Nashville, Tenn.

Many of the musicians have been influenced by African-American blues (see jazz) and gospel music, but the performers and audience are almost all white. Leading performers include Jimmy Rodgers, the Carter Family, Hank Williams and his son, Tex Ritter, Chet Atkins, Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, June Carter-Cash, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, George Jones, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, Charley Pride, Charlie Rich, Dolly Parton, and Willie Nelson. In the 1960s and 70s, country and western music significantly influenced the development of rock music. Since then, it has undergone a national revival with performers such as Ricky Scaggs, Garth Brooks, the Judds, Tanya Tucker, and Reba McEntire achieving great popularity. http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0813789.html  

For a more indepth history with examples of artists and styles of Country and Western music check out http://www.roughstock.com/history/

The first of two videos below shows an example of "Southwest" style. The second is a "Southeast" instrumentation. Both performances were at the Grand Ole Opry.

Barbara Mandrell -- I Was Country (When Country Was'nt Cool)

 

Bill Monroe & Earl Scruggs at the Grand Ole Opry

 

 

With Ballad and Song:

For millenium, legends have beem told and retold. Music was in many ways a medium for the media of the past.   Entertaining songs and ballads became popular vehicles for passing down folklore and traditional wisdom. Also traveling performers often brought news of current events. In time, memories of some could become the legends of others.

The ballad
"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald"
by folksinger Gordon Lightfoot
is a good example of how the ancient art of storytelling through song lives on to this day.

 

Loretta Lynn performs "Coal Miner's Daughter" at the Grand Ole Opry

oprylive November 20, 2007 Loretta Lynn performs "Coal Miner's Daughter" on GAC's Opry Live from the Grand Ole Opry

When two musical icons like Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis join forces for a concert you know you're in for something special and this show delivers exactly that. Filmed over two nights in January 2007 at New York's Lincoln Center, this magical show sees Willie and Wynton combine their unique talents in a blend of jazz, blues and country music which takes in Willie Nelson originals, traditional songs and standards by the likes of Hoagy Carmichael, Jimmy Reed and Duke Ellington.

 

 

   

 

Note: This site on "Global Music Appreciation" is a work in progress. Thie main purpose of being online at this point of development is to allow collaborators and friends to view the progress, make suggestions and provide comments.

You may find "scratch notes" concerning future implementaion of goals. Pages will still be partially complete or even blank.

Yet, there is still an ever-evolving growing selection of music from around the world linked too in this site. You are welcome to look, play and experience music as performed from around the world.

Sincerely

David

 

 

 

 

 

 

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